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Webinar! Harnessing informal providers for health systems improvement: Lessons from India

posted Jan 8, 2013, 5:04 AM by Kate Hawkins   [ updated Jan 8, 2013, 10:22 AM ]
Tuesday, February 5, 2013
18.00 - 19.30 IST
07.30 - 09.00 EST
12.30 - 14.00 GMT

"It may be startling to learn that a large portion of rural health care in India is provided by people without formal medical training. Yet simply advocating for an increase in the number of trained medical providers ignores both the scale and the multiple dimensions of the problem." Jishnu Das, World Bank 

"One things is certain, informal providers represent a growing and undeniable force within the health community, and despite the refusal of some governments and others to acknowledge/engage with them, it is in all our interests - particularly the patients - to begin working more effectively with these elusive actors." Tom Feeny, Hanshep 

Many of the world's poor rely on informal providers of healthcare. But little has been known about the dynamics of the health markets for their goods and services. Who are informal providers and what drives them? How are they organised and what influences their practice? Most importantly, how can we harness the power of the sector and mitigate the negative effects of poor performance? 

Research that uncovers more about informal providers is an important first step. 

This webinar will present findings from new studies on the role of informal providers in Bangladesh, India, and Nigeria, with a special focus on India. This research was supported by the Center for Health Market Innovations (CHMI). 

Panelists Meenakshi Gautham, of the Centre for Research in New International Economic Order (CRENIEO), and Gina Lagomarsino, of the Results for Development Institute, will focus on the role of informal providers in care delivery. 

Please join us for this interactive online session. Participants will be able to pose questions to speakers to find out more about the studies. 

This webinar is organised by the Private Sector in Health Symposium. It is co-sponsored by the Future Health Systems Consortium. Gerry Bloom from Future Health Systems will moderate the event. 

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